The value of kindness

Kindness matters more than one might think.

Developing into a good person is even more important than developing into a good athlete. No matter how gifted, skilled, or accomplished you may be, you will be remembered by how you made others feel. In the world of top level sports, there are many highly-skilled athletes, some who are famous and wealthy. Even though they might dazzle us with their exceptional skills and abilities, it’s their personalities and kindness that touch and impact us most. Acts of kindness have many forms. As an athlete, helping the coach set up or break down practice equipment is a great way to show kindness. Take time at the end of a competition to thank officials, volunteers, coaches, teammates, and family. American tennis coach and former professional tennis player, Brad Gilbert, made sure his players (including world number ones Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick) thanked all of the tournament staff, ball kids and volunteers before leaving the site!
Any random acts of kindness are welcome. We have seen many great athletes such as Ben Cohen, Lionel Messi, Simone Biles, Tim Tebow (photo) , Kevin Anderson, and Roger Federer give their time and efforts to charities and projects that help those less fortunate. Champion minded athletes love giving back. They acknowledge they have been blessed to do what they do in their lives. Not only do acts of kindness help others, but they also increase your own energy and attitude.

I believe that sport today doesn’t need better athletes, but rather better people. Role models that will inspire others to greatness. Today’s youth need positive role model’s, not more records.

5 Examples of Acts of Kindness:

1. Thanking parents for all the time spent transporting you to practices and competitions, supporting you, cheering for you, and making the journey possible for you.

2. Treating everyone,regardless of status or position, with the same respect.

3. Thanking coaches,staff, officials, volunteers, fans,drivers, etc.

4. Lending your time (and skills) to a charity organization or foundation.

5. Having empathy for others who are going through tough times (injury, life issues, etc.)

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